Thailand's IKEA Bang Yai transforms into a circular shop  - Scandasia

Thailand's IKEA Bang Yai transforms into a circular shop ScandAsia.com

Thailand's IKEA Bang Yai transforms into a circular shop  - Scandasia

Thailand’s IKEA Bang Yai transforms into a circular shop

- by Gregers Møller - Leave a Comment

As part of the Swedish furniture giant IKEA’s global effort to become a more sustainable business, IKEA Bang Yai in Thailand has been turned into a circular store.

According to Greenqueen , IKEA Bang Yai is the first outlet in Thailand to adopt IKEA’s global Circular Store concept and here customers can shop second-hand furniture, bring their preloved items in for resale, and earn points by sorting and recycling their waste for collection.

Ikano Private Limited which operates IKEA Thailand, IKEA Singapore and IKEA Malaysia have already been adopting new strategies to lower its waste, but customers are now seeking even more circular options, the company says. Besides being able to buy used IKEA furniture at a discounted price, customers can also sell their own preloved home furnishings and bring recyclable waste for drop off at the recycling center.

Bringing recyclables will also be rewarded with IKEA Family Points and for every 5,000 points collected, customers will receive a 50 Baht voucher to spend in stores.

IKEA Bang Yai store manager Tom Suter says that IKEA hopes the initiative will encourage more Thai consumers to incorporate sustainability into their everyday lifestyles.

“IKEA is inviting everyone to join our journey towards sustainability together. We can easily start at home where each individual can contribute to a more circular economy,” he says. “IKEA will continue to create new services and products for a more sustainable world.”

Another element in IKEA’s efforts to become a more sustainable business also includes turning at least half of its in-store menu plant-based by 2025. Last year, the Swedish furniture giant launched its plant-based take on the iconic meatballs which have just 4 percent of the carbon footprint compared to its traditional meat-based counterpart.

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